{:en}Creative economy conference outlines agenda for the future of inclusive industries globally{:}{:ar}توقعات بوصول حجم سوق تقنية الرموز غير القابلة للاستبدال في العالم إلى 400 مليار دولار بحلول 2025{:}

{:en}

DUBAI, 7 December 2021 – The future of the world’s creative industries and how to make them more inclusive came under the spotlight on Tuesday during the afternoon sessions at the first day of the second World Conference on Creative Economy (WCCE), which runs from 7–9 December at Dubai Exhibition Centre, Expo 2020 Dubai.

 

{:en}Creative economy conference outlines agenda for the future of inclusive industries globally{:}{:ar}توقعات بوصول حجم سوق تقنية الرموز غير القابلة للاستبدال في العالم إلى 400 مليار دولار بحلول 2025{:}
DUBAI, 07 December 2021. Her Excellency Shaikha Mai Bint Mohammed Al-Khalifa, President of the Bahrain Authority for Culture and Antiquities and Chairperson of the Board of the Arab Regional Centre for World Heritage, speaks during World Conference on Creative Economy at Dubai Exhibition Centre, Expo 2020 Dubai. (Photo by Miaad Mahdi/Expo 2020 Dubai)

A panel of world thought leaders, creatives, and innovators emphasised the importance of driving opportunities for entrepreneurship; bolstering the creative sector with tangible economic benefits; and creating an education system that encourages young people to explore their own creativity, express the creativity of their communities, and enables them to make a living.

Her Excellency Sheikha Alia Khalid Al Qassimi, Assistant Undersecretary for the Cultural and Creative Industries Sector, Ministry of Culture and Youth, UAE, said: “The term ‘inclusive creative’ is not just an expression of an ethical value and an ideal, but also an ideal that is applicable to our pursuit of greater economic potential for the sector.”

During ‘CCI Global Agenda: 11 Key Actions’, Eliza Easton, Head of Policy, Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre and Nesta, and Policy Fellow, University of Cambridge called on the audience to share the Global Agenda for the Cultural and Creative Industries, written alongside the Policy & Evidence Centre (PEC) International Council, which sets out 11 key actions for international creative industries and governments worldwide to support the growth of creative industries and help them to tackle some of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. Underlining its importance, she said: “Globally, the creative industries are overwhelmingly made up of freelancers and advisory businesses. In the UK, one in three people working in the creative industries is self-employed and, through speaking to colleagues, I believe that figure is going to be the same or larger in many nations around the world.

“And through discussions with the [UK’s] Arts and Humanities Research Council over a number of years, we have heard again and again, how that group in particular is not being represented at the local, national or international level. They have limited protection and are being overlooked in key policy areas.”

Tita Larasati, Indonesian industrial designer and cartoonist, focused on the global agenda’s 11th action, which calls for international cooperation for cultural and creative industries governance, emphasising the importance of collaboration: “A creative city means everyone should have a partner, which is why we are building a dashboard of crediting index that can be a tool used by local governments to make policies and regulations based on real-time.”

Speaking virtually from New York, Laura Callanan, Founding Partner, Upstart Co-Lab, highlighted how impact investing can complement government funding for creative industries and non-profit support for arts and culture, saying: “The idea of profit with purpose has become the standard for good business and for good investment.

“Impact investing is proper investing: it’s not a philanthropic support or government funding, but it’s investing that is trying to do more than simply make money. It also seeks to drive social and environmental impact by paying attention to the welfare of workers, the community and the planet.”

In ‘NFTs: Inclusive Leadership’, experts discussed the potential of non-fungible tokens (NFTs) in supporting the creative world, with participants adding that the world is changing rapidly in light of technological progress.

Christopher Deschenes, CEO, Kalamint – the first NFT marketplace on blockchain platform Tezos – predicts that the market size of NFTs will reach USD 400 billion by 2025: “We are working on creating a platform for innovators to work in a safe environment.”

Over three days, a large global community of entrepreneurs, creatives and policymakers are coming together in person and virtually, where they are being joined by world-leading speakers, thinkers and doers to take decisive action and set out an agenda for the immediate future of the creative economy, helping to build it on inclusive, responsible, and human-first foundations.

{:}{:ar}دبي، 7 ديسمبر 2021 – عُقدت اليوم الثلاثاء جلسة بعنوان “الرموز غير القابلة للاستبدال: الشمول في القيادة” ضمن فعاليات المؤتمر العالمي للاقتصاد الإبداعي المنعقد في مركز دبي للمعارض في إكسبو 2020 دبي، كُشف خلالها عن توقعات بوصول حجم سوق تقنية الرموز غير القابلة للاستبدال (NFTS) في العالم إلى 400 مليار دولار بحلول سنة 2025.

والرموز غير القابلة للاستبدال هي بمثابة شهادة إثبات رقمية تُمنح للأعمال الفنية الأصلية. وتعتمد هذه الرموز على تقنية سلاسل الكتل (البلوكتشين) لتسجيل ملكية النسخة الأصلية من أي عمل فني، سواء كان هذا العمل الفني رسما أو موسيقى أو أي صنف آخر من صنوف الفن.

وناقش الخبراء خلال المؤتمر التحول التكنولوجي والإمكانات الشاملة لـتقنية الرموز غير القابلة للاستبدال في العالم الإبداعي، حيث أشار عدد من المتحدثين إلى سرعة التغير في العالم في ظل التطور التكنولوجي المستمر. وخلال الجلسة النقاشية، قال كريس ديشينيس، الرئيس التنفيذي في كالامينت: “نعمل على إيجاد منصة للمبدعين للعمل في إجواء آمنة”، مشيرا إلى التوقعات بأن يصل حجم سوق الرموز غير القابلة للاستبدال إلى 400 مليار دولار.

من جانبها، قالت إستل أوهايون، الرئيس التنفيذي لـشركة (إن إف تي – بي إي زد إل): “أعتقد أن وقتنا الحاضر ربما يكون أكثر الأوقات إبداعا في التاريخ… تمكّن تقنية الرموز غير القابلة للاستبدال الفنانين غير التقليديين من استكشاف أنواع مختلفة من الوظائف الجديدة واضافتها لسوق الفن”.

{:en}Creative economy conference outlines agenda for the future of inclusive industries globally{:}{:ar}توقعات بوصول حجم سوق تقنية الرموز غير القابلة للاستبدال في العالم إلى 400 مليار دولار بحلول 2025{:}
DUBAI, 07 December 2021. Her Excellency Shaikha Mai Bint Mohammed Al-Khalifa, President of the Bahrain Authority for Culture and Antiquities and Chairperson of the Board of the Arab Regional Centre for World Heritage, speaks during World Conference on Creative Economy at Dubai Exhibition Centre, Expo 2020 Dubai. (Photo by Miaad Mahdi/Expo 2020 Dubai)

بدوره، قال راؤول ميلهادو، الشريك المؤسس في إليتيوم: “حققت بعض المنظّمات نجاحات كبيرة في تبني التقنيات الحديثة؛ وبدأ فنانون يستثمرون في الفنون ثلاثية الأبعاد”. وأشار المشاركون أيضا إلى الدور الكبير الذي ستؤديه هذه التقنية في حماية حقوق التأليف والنشر ، فضلاً عن تبني نماذج بيع عادلة.

وبخصوص الاستثمار المؤثّر في الاقتصاد الإبداعي، قالت لورا كالانان، الشريك المؤسس في شركة أبستارت: “الاستثمار المؤثر يحاول أن يفعل أكثر من مجرد جني الأموال، ويسعى أيضا إلى إحداث تأثير اجتماعي وبيئي من خلال الاهتمام برفاهية العمال والمجتمع والكوكب”.

وتستضيف وزارة الثقافة والشباب نخبة من قادة الفكر والمُبدعين والمُبتكرين حول العالم في المؤتمر العالمي للاقتصاد الإبداعي الذي يقام تحت شعار “ابداع متكامل: يصنع المستقبل” ويستمر حتى التاسع من ديسمبر في مركز دبي للمعارض، وذلك ضمن سلسلة المؤتمرات والفعاليات التي تنظمها الوزارة في إكسبو 2020 دبي.

ويشكل المؤتمر آخر فعاليات السنة الدولية للاقتصاد الإبداعي من أجل التنمية المستدامة، التي أعلنتها الأمم المتحدة عام 2021. ويحظى المشاركون بفرصة استعراض أعمالهم الإبداعية في المنصات أو المداخل الرئيسية وغيرها من المساحات المتوفرة لهم، وصولا إلى منصات المؤتمر لتبادل الأفكار مع نخبة من الخبراء المتخصصين في هذا المجال.{:}